Sacramento Art History Consortium

reviews, musings, and general art-related chatter

Tag: SAHC

Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Evan Thomas

by Bree Garcia

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ET:  This is the first year I’ve exhibited my art since the 1990s. I fell back into art trying to kill time first drawing on my iTouch, and I ended up with enough for a show. My first show at Spanish Fly Hair Garage sold well and justified my purchase of an iPad Mini, which is now my main tool. I exhibited and demonstrated for a week my iPad art at this year’s California State Fair in the Fine Arts Hall. I also took part (OK, full disclosure, I was the curator) in a two-man show with Patrick Drayus at Annie’s Playshop and Gallery in Sacramento. I’ve also been teaching iPad Art techniques at the Unitarian Church in Sacramento.

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SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style? ET:

Any cheap trick/port in storm will do, and any theft or appropriation I can do something original with will do. Sometimes I work from imagination, sometimes from an imported image, such as a Fra Lippo Lippi quattrocento Madonna. Sometimes I go directly over a digitial photo of a porch’s cafe set in Curtis Park. Lately I’ve been working with pen on paper drawings of mine imported into my iPad. Style is something I care very little about. No lie. It takes care of itself. I use different stylistic mannerisms, but my work looks like it’s been done by the same person. I will humbly attribute this to an admiration of and intention to work in the modes of classicist artists such as Basquiat, Hockney, Pollock Picasso and Poussin, especially in terms of composition.

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iPads are wonderful surfaces for drawing or painting whether using your fingers or a stylus. Most recently I’ve been using a TruGlide Pro Paintbrush tip from LYNKtec –  a sponsor of mine, and it’s fun. iPads also have a great economic advantages such as making studio space real cheap since a backpack can hold an iPad Mini. More savings come from the clothes not ruined by messy art supplies. My images are printed as signed, limited editions on archival paper at CaliColor, a local Giclee print service.

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SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community?

ET: Job one is to do good work. Let’s be real. Visual artists are the least effective of polemicists.

 

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SAHC: What advice do you have for emerging artists, or those pursuing a career in the arts? ET: The simple truth is that many are called but few get up. Artist should create early, midday or late, but most importantly, often and steadily. Don’t give your art away and cheapen your market. The business and promotional aspects will demand more time than you think. Be polite. There are too many artists are are out there, and the difficult ones fall behind.

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SAHC: Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why? ET:  Patrick Drayus and Perez Mandark Westbrook are two of my favorites, local or otherwise. Their stuff  is for everyone. It can be taken in by the kid at the skateboard park or the matron at a museum. I doubt  either would call themselves neo-funk artists, and might even argue with the designation, but their work has the same playfulness and a similar edge the funk art the Sacramento  region is known for.

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SAHC: Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found? ET:  Facebook and Instagram are my main tools for keeping up with local artists and art events. It was on Facebook that Carol Buchanan of the State Fair found and recruited me. I’m also obliged to mention Annie’s Playshop and Gallery owned by Lisa Weil, and of which  am the curator.  

SAHC: Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader? ET:  Sacramento is a great art town to start from, but for anyone ambitious, leaving Dodge is probably gonna have to happen. We lack the financial means to sustain art careers like the Bay Area or Southern California. The good news is that those moving out clear the decks for others. That’s probably why there is always something interesting going on with art in this town.

evan SAHC: Where can your work be viewed, or found online?

I will be showing at the Denim Spot (20th and J) this December for their Affordable Art Show (My pieces will be $130.00 framed and matted.

Call 916 848 9616 for private viewing.

I post almost  almost daily, and sometime more than, daily at:

http://evanartworks.com

http://facebook.com/ipadart

http://instagram.com/evanartworks

http://twitter.com/evanartworks

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Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Shonna McDaniels

by Bree Garcia

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SMD:  My goal as an artist is to share the strength and majesty of ancient African culture via beautiful paintings, mixed media, clay pottery and Styrofoam.

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SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style?

SMD: I believe my African ancestors work through my fingers to create each brush stroke or art sculpture. My creative process generally begins with a large canvas. Paintings of women with dark blue hues, purple and brown skin tones stimulates love, passion, beauty and hope as my hands move across the canvas. My hands are driven by a spiritual force connected to the motherland. The spiritual essence from my ancestors shines through. It’s a humbling experience. My chosen medium is oil paint but I also work in pastels, charcoal, acrylic, water color, mix media utilizing fabric, beads and other recycled materials.

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SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community?

SMD: My purpose as an artist is to leave a legacy for future artist. I want young black girls and boys to look at my art and experience something of worth, pride and value. For this reason I strive to have the essence of my work reflect dignity, strength and beauty of each subject that I present. The education of youth for me is very important and I have spent a large part of my career as an artist educating youth. I feel today, more than ever, that art is needed by young people as a forum for safe expression, communication, exploration, imagination, cultural and historical understanding.  Art is an essential, encompassing life element that has the ability to produce an environment with a productive, cultural exchange of ideas. In addition, art promotes acquisition of intellectual skills in literature, science, and math. Indeed, art should be a priority in human development.  Art has the ability to inspire youth to be creative, think outside the box and use their skills to beautify their environment.

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SAHC: What advice do you have for emerging artists, or those pursuing a career in the arts?

SMD: First of all, my advice to emerging artists is to always be true to whom you are as a human being and everything else will fall into place. Secondly, always be a student of art and never except the idea that you are not.

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SAHC: Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?

SMD:  My favorite Sacramento Artist can’t be narrowed to just one artist.. I have many favorites and most of them are my close circle of friends that I have worked with for 10 or more years. This list is as follows: Daphne Burgess, John King, GOS, Kanika Marshall, Joe Pollakoff, Marshall Bailey, Debra Ledet, Alpha Bruton, Frank Blackwell, Jose Lott, Anthony Padilla,David Lonbenber and Akinsaya Kambon. These individuals have all played a special role in my life and have inspired and nurtured me in my journey as an Artist.

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SAHC: Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found?

SMD: My favorite online resource is Black Art in America. Additionally, I have a love for any Art History books, documentaries or magazines that provide information on the Harlem Renaissance. This is the period in history when black artist were accomplishing greatness in a time that defied all odds.  They had the courage to uplift themselves and achieve greatness. This period of Art history has always inspired me and prompted me to educate the children and youth about a special era in our history.

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SAHC: Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader?

SMD: I feel Art in Sacramento should reflect more diversity. I would love to see more murals and life size sculptures which reflect the legacy and the hard work that African people embarked on to help build our communities and the nation at large. I feel youth would be more inspired and uplifted if they were inspired by public art in their communities that reflects their image.

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SAHC:Where can your work be viewed, or found online?

SMD: One can just type in my name Shonna McDaniels or visit the Sojo Museum at 2251 Florin rd or the Sojo website at http://www.sojoarts.net

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Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Jared Konopitski

by Bree Garcia

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Artist Bio: I am an artist living and working in Sacramento, California. I work in many mediums, however, primarily with acrylic paintings. My work has been exhibited at galleries, festivals, and museums across the US and Internationally including; The Smithsonian, Washington D.C.; The Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, CA; and The Mutter Museum, Philadelphia, PA. I have had my work featured in Color Ink Book (2013),  Papercut Magazine (2013), Arcana’s Steampunk Originals (2013), Heavy Metal Magazine (2012), Catapult Magazine (2012), DisColouring Book (2012), Penumbra eZine (2012),  Juxtapoz (2011), And Wow!cool! Psycho Nurse Calendar (2011). I have also worked for clients such as Universal Studios, The Art O Mat, and TurningArt. In addition, I have curated numerous gallery shows and corporate art seminars. In my spare time I enjoy facilitating art workshops, with focus on early art education.

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SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style?

JK: I am inspired by all things beautifully weird, such as monsters, the bugs living under the rocks, creatures in jars, ghosts, all the nooks and crannies of nature. But I am also inspired by comics, cartoons, noise music and neon anything. So I try to paint the way these things make me feel. Sometimes it comes out fun, sometimes scary, sometimes cute, and sometimes ugly. But I love it all. I prefer painting with acrylics on wood. And after the acrylics are laid down, I love to go over everything with black Ink. The black ink brings out the detail and gives the whole painting a better sense of flow.

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SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community? 

JK: I believe I must share this talent with others. Show those in this town and beyond that art can be fun. That it doesn’t have to be perfect and it can be a gateway to all kinds of adventures. I want to show people that art is accessible to anyone and can be used to solve more problems than most folks realize.

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SAHC: What advice do you have for emerging artists or those pursuing a career in the arts?

JK: Practice, practice, practice. Never stop creating. Try to figure out how the artists you admire paint, then put your own spin to it. Do not be afraid of rejection. Rejection will happen. Show your art everywhere you can. Amazing opportunities will arise with passion, persistence, positivity and a good work ethic. And above it all, have fun and love what you do!

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SAHC: Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?


JK: Jill Allyn Stafford, because of her collages with great meaning and composition, and she has a heart of compassion for others and she is ALWAYS giving back. Corey Bernardt, Stephen Williams, Shaun Burner, Waylon Horner, Andy Steele, Jared Tharp and everyone at the Sol Collective Colab for making some high quality work. John Stuart Berger, Skinner, Cinder, Shane Grammer for being early inspirations. Gary Pruner, for teaching me color. And anyone in Sacramento that keeps creating, that keeps the weirdness alive, and has inspired me during this crazy art ride. Waaaaay to many to list, but they all mean a ton to me!

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SAHC: Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found?

JK: I enjoy visiting the Crocker Art Museum. They have had amazing shows filled with modern day masters to art legends. I learn a lot from their exhibits and really love what they are bringing to the Sacramento area. And also, I love looking at the back issues of all of our comic book shops in town. There is a whole history of art sub culture in there that just makes me happy.

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SAHC: Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader?

JK: Check out the galleries and such off the beaten path. There are many amazing things happening at Exhibit S, The Temp, Dragatomi, Verge, Empire Comics and more. Go to these places, meet the people and see what is happening creatively in our city. 

If you are interested in being one of SAHC’s featured artists, email us at: info@sacramentoarthistory.org

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Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Dawn Star Wood

by Bree Garcia

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 DSW: As a watercolorist based out of the central California area, I have been active within the local community while also communicating with artists not only elsewhere in the United States but abroad. At the moment I am one of the collective artists of Blue Moon Gallery in Sacramento along with one of the consignment artists of Sunlight of the Spirit Book and Gifts shop which is also located in Sacramento.  I have also been active in several smaller organizations such as being one of the founding members of deviantSAC where we focus on bringing attention to local artists, to my work with other groups helping in drawing awareness to a small variety of issues.

My most recent collaboration has been my first overseas one which was with the editorial assistant for the Salvation Army of Finland’s magazine SotaHuuto, having allowing the use and publishing of my painting “Virgin Mary” in their Finnish & Swedish publications for their August 2012 issue. I have also participated in the yearly KVIE Art Auction in Sacramento from 2008 to present, having been chosen for Juror’s Award in 2012. This year I have had the chance to be one of the artists for Quixotic Magazine’s first issue, a guest speaker for one of Amador County Artists Association’s monthly meetings, accepted into KVIE’s Art Auction 2013, and accepted into Pence Gallery (Davis).

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SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style?

DSW:   I have a wide range of things that inspire me, from the gentle beauty of various elements of nature to the curves of a classic vehicle but I have to say what frequently pulls me back to paint time and time again is anything dealing with European and Asian culture. I’m not really sure about my style by my work tends to lean more towards Art Nouveau in some aspects. Watercolors are my main medium but on occasion I do tend to create pieces that are of mixed media.

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SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community?

 DSW:  I would think that in a way, as artists, we are responsible for bringing attention to various issues to try to bring about positive change. Our work tells stories and a point of view to things that normally would be overlooked by others. Through the connections we make with people through our pieces, we network with those in our own community and beyond, brainstorm ideas, give constructive critiques, and inspire.

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 SAHC: What advice do you have for emerging artists, or those pursuing a career in the arts?

DSW:   My advice is to experiment and a lot of practice. I constantly get told by people that my work has inspired them to try watercolors for the first time but they’re not that good with them. I just advise that you practice the basics first and know that you’re not going to paint a Mona Lisa your first time. Mistakes are going to happen. If, while working with watercolors, you find you don’t like one particular method or find that something doesn’t work for you, don’t be afraid to try something that will work with your style. If you discover that mixed media is more fitting with what you’re wanting, go for it. Just never be afraid to try something new and remember to practice. As far as having a career in the field, be prepared for a lot of hard work and people having the pre-notion that being an artist is the easiest thing in the world or is only a hobby.

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 SAHC: Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?

DSW:  I actually know several area artists so it is difficult to say I have ‘favorites’, mostly due the fact that I have made friends and worked with a number of them. One Sacramento based artist who I had the pleasure of showing work with and becoming friends with is the late Kennith Potter. An internationally known watercolorist who was unique in every way, we originally didn’t see eye-to-eye on how I presented my work since he was more European/traditional in his subject matters and presentation where I was pushing the envelope a bit with my pieces at the time. After a couple of years of getting to know one another, my best moment was a few months before he passed away, he had nodded in approval of one of my pieces and let me know that it was one of the best works I had done up to that point. Thinking of that day always brings a smile to my face.

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SAHC: Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found?

DSW:  I personally have a growing collection of resource and reference books which I often go to for information and inspiration. Outside of my own home, however, I often look to several museums in the Northern California area such as Crocker Art Museum, Asian Art Museum, SFMOMA, and Legion of Honor. Other favorite stops for me when gathering resources are classic car shows and antique shops.

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 SAHC: Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader?

DSW:  Though seemingly not as established as other cities, the arts in Sacramento are becoming better rooted and are blossoming into a promising scene. There is a mix of the traditional and contemporary artists who have already made themselves a name within the Greater Sacramento area and the younger emerging artists who are spotlighting urban influences and abstract imagery. Though a bit of a see-saw affect at the moment as everyone is competing for recognition, in a strange way the two sides do balance each other. Perhaps in the coming years, Sacramento will be known for its art just as much as it’s known for its trees and architecture.

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 SAHC: Where can your work be viewed, or found online?

 DSW:  People can usually find my work at Blue Moon Gallery in Sacramento but as far online, you can find examples of my work at http://dawnstarw.deviantart.com/ or follow me on Facebook at Dawn Star Wood Art to be updated on events and venues I have work at.

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 If you are interested in being one of SAHC’s featured artists, email us at: info@sacramentoarthistory.org

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Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Joy Bertinuson

by Bree Garcia

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JB:  In the early 90’s I transferred from Diablo Valley College, a community college in Pleasant Hill, CA, to California State University, Sacramento.  After earning a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art from CSUS, in 1994, I looked for any work I could find in my field with just an undergraduate degree. My first job in the arts was working with disabled adults. I had a brief stint teaching art at the Short Center South, before landing a full-time job at Southside Art Center where I also taught art classes, and took students out on excursions into the world-at-large as a community access instructor.  Not long afterwards, while continuing to look for interesting work through the want ads in the newspaper, I saw an announcement for an Artist! The job turned out to be a gig teaching visual arts classes to incarcerated juveniles through the California Youth Authority system. It paid well, as it should have considering that I signed away my rights for the authorities to negotiate for my life in the case of a hostage situation. Between undergraduate and graduate school I had the opportunity to attend The School of the Art Institute, Chicago, for a couple of summer sessions as I toyed with the idea of attending graduate school there in the future. I also taught art classes to children in a number of venues, and finally taught for an entire school year at the Natomas Charter School Visual and Performing Arts Academy. This experience, which revealed my lack of classroom management skills in a room full of hormonal teenagers, was the determining factor which lead me away from obtaining a teaching credential and towards earning a master’s degree. While attending Claremont Graduate University I continued to teach art; working in the adult prison system through the Arts in Corrections program. After earning a Master of Fine Arts degree in 2002 I returned to Sacramento and began teaching at American River College where I have taught for the last ten years. I have also taught at Sierra College for the last eight years, and was recently hired to teach at California State University, Sacramento.

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SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style?

 JB: Although I have primarily identified with being a painter for much of my adult life, I’ve also picked up the habit of pyrography, otherwise known as wood-burning. Additionally, I work in assemblage, and tend to incorporate painting and pyrography into these three dimensional works.  I consider myself a narrative artist who draws upon personal experience, along with invention, to create works that are at times humorous, absurd, and dark. I am also interested the reinvention of historical works of art to reflect contemporary themes.

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SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community?

JB:  I think it is important to participate in, and promote, the scene here. I’ve tried to do this by supporting fellow artists through collecting their works, creating opportunities for them to exhibit, and by creating venues for them to present lectures. While artists complain about the local art scene, and Sacramento in general, as someone who has chosen to live here, I feel an obligation to work with what we’ve got, and contribute to it, rather than disparage it.

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SAHC:  What advice do you have for emerging artists, or those pursuing a career in the arts?

JB:   Where to begin? First, I admit that from the moment I declared art as my major, I defended my decision by stating that I would make a living by teaching. I didn’t know if I would like teaching or if I would get a job, or even if I really would…teach. But I do like it, and even have moments when I feel like I am pretty good at it.  I never imagined trying to make a living by selling my art, and I knew that the commercial or graphic art route was not one I wanted to pursue either.  My advice, go with your gut, do what you want, and try to find a way to support your art habit. Experiment, make work that speaks to you, and surround yourself with good people that share your values. You probably won’t make a lot of money, so try not to live beyond your means. Finally, don’t bury your head in the sand; every young artist thinks they are the first. So, know your history, know the artists that came before and try to keep up on what’s happening now!

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SAHC:  Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?

JB:  I have to say that I have been collecting art for only about ten years, but since that time I have accumulated the works of at least 30 artists from this region. I have acquired work by purchasing it (many galleries and individual artists will take payments spread out over a period of time), trading, and occasionally begging. With that said, I will mention just some of my favorites. Also, keep in mind that my descriptions of why I find these artists’ works stimulating may, or may not, align with their own views of their work.

In alphabetical order I will begin with Julia Couzens who can make poetry out of any material. Tape drawings, yarn webs, and flattened strawberry basket wall hangings are just a few examples of the kinds of things she makes.  She is clearly driven by her own fascinating investigations.

Anne Gregory uniquely combines beautiful patterns, textures, and colors with unsettling figures, some reminiscent of those made by non-western cultures. Her watercolors, and mixed media large-scale charcoal drawings, often include layers of plant and animal imagery along with male and female figures.

Jack Ogden animates the subjects of his paintings in such a way as to make objects behave, or misbehave, in surprising ways. Brushes shuffle across the surface, paint sloshes from bowls, flat planes refuse to remain seated.  Even his figures, posed in groups, present a conundrum; the blankness of their expressions seems to deny the evidence at their feet.

Ron Peetz makes conceptual artworks, or “one-liners” as I’ve heard him call them, that are both smart and funny. He is not limited by mediums, but instead chooses the objects, materials, and processes, that best present the ideas he is trying to convey. One such example consists of two mirrors, each hung on the far edge of two adjoining walls meeting at the corner. One of the mirrors is etched with the word “ah” in the center, which creates the words “ah ha” revealed through the reflection of the word in the other mirror.  The moment of revelation, that “ah ha” moment, is experienced in the split-second it takes to see, read, and comprehend the reflection. The experience is mirrored in the work, and the work demonstrates the experience in the mirror; to the delight of the spectator.

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SAHC:  Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found?

JB:  Like many people who used to subscribe to art magazines, I have primarily transitioned to getting my information digitally. Occasionally I still pick up an Art News, Art in America, Frieze, or Art Ltd. I subscribe to New American Paintings, and I receive emails from a number of galleries and museums, so I get introduced to artists via email regularly. I read art reviews online at www.artslant.com which has reviews of exhibits in major cities around the world, while www.squarecylinder.com, by David M.Roth, is a great resource for local and Bay Area shows. Renny Pritikin, an Art Practical contributor, turned me on this online publication which focuses on Bay Area art and can be found at www.artpractical.com. As a member of the College Art Association I occasionally read articles from their publications such as Art Journal or The Art Bulletin. I also have my collection of weathered, and new, art history books, and catalogues from shows. The best resources are the galleries and museums themselves.

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SAHC:  Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader?

JB:  It’s funny because I think Sacramento’s art scene is quite visible and accessible to the general public, but every semester I get a new classroom of students who are oblivious to the scene here. Or, conversely, they have only heard about the crimes that have occurred during 2nd Saturday, despite the fact that those crimes occurred after the galleries had long closed up for the evening. Although art does not drive commerce here like it does in places like New York or Los Angeles, there is a surprising mix of artists involved in the arts, at many levels, who make work that challenges the notion of this being a naïve “cow-town.” That said, one of the biggest complaints from artists is that we do not have the patronage to support us. There are not enough private collectors, there is the Crocker Art Museum which can only purchase so many local artists’ works, and organizations such as the Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission continue to have their budgets hacked away at.

We have an impressive number of commercial galleries, considering that 20 years ago I could have counted them all on one or two hands. At last count I think there were at least 60 in the region, however many seem to pop up and disappear just as quickly, while others have a good run, and others still throw in the towel after years of struggling to stay afloat here. As a former board member of the Center for Contemporary Art, Sacramento, I am glad to see that the non-profit organization continues to redefine itself while simultaneously remaining a premier location to see contemporary art. They too suffer from major budgetary constraints, but manage to move with the times, by introducing QR codes on their exhibition labels, for example. This is just one example of how they engage the younger audiences, who get all of their news and information from their smart phones it seems. The Verge Center for the Arts, another non-profit organization, has also attracted the up-and-coming generation of artists, and art supporters, through their studio program and their popular events combining art, food, and music. They are still growing and developing; however I look forward to them re-opening, in about six months or so, with a full line up of exhibitions scheduled.

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SAHC: Where can your work be viewed, or found online?

JB: http://www.joybertinuson.com/

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Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: John Titus Krempel

by Bree Garcia

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JTC: John Titus Krempel is a native of Ohio who has lived in New York City, San Francisco & now Sacramento since 2000.  As an artist, he specializes in mixed media, impressionism and abstract expressionism painting, the human figure, and digital photography.  Mr. Krempel draws inspiration from his life experiences in and around the places he has lived & visited.

In his early adult life John lived in Akron & Cincinnati Ohio where he went to college and received a Bachelor of Arts & Masters in Counseling and Education.  In his professional life, he has worked with people on wide variety of psychological needs providing Mr. Krempel with an intellectual insight into the three-dimensional world that he expresses in his art.  John’s art brings forth his view of the surrounding world from a visual, tactile, and psychological perspective.

John was greatly influenced by the abstract expressionist movement of San Francisco from the mid-twentieth century.  His work reflects a worldly view of great natural and man-made beauty.  In his paintings one can often see references to the mountains, valleys, rivers, Oceans, coupled with the built environment, buildings and architecture.  John has participated in over 80 art shows & events in the past ten years, and his art is in both private and public collections throughout the United States and around the world.

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SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style?

JTC: My creative process is pretty simple. First I have an idea, or, for a commission the idea is already there. Next I pick out my palette/colors & materials. The next step is to not ‘over-think’ it. I just allow the paint to flow.  I continue to work until my eye tells me it’s finished. There may be minutes between steps, or days, even weeks… maybe longer!

My two main styles are abstract expressionism and impressionistic.  Starting out, my preferred main medium is oil on canvas or wood.  Usually, but not always, ending up as mixed media. Materials such as paper, wood, cloth, metal, sand, earth, glass, rope or any other possible medium tend to make it’s way into my work.  I love texture, the more the better!

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SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community?

JTC: To help educate artists, young, old, budding artists, alike on gaining confidence to show and sell their art… to allow those artists to experiment with ‘unorthodox’ techniques to come up with a personal unique style, without judging as right or wrong.

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SAHC: What advice do you have for emerging artists, or those pursuing a career in the arts?

JTC: Learn how to sell your own art.  Relying on others to do it for you makes it tougher for you to make a living at it.  Once you have accomplished this, you can then, allow others to help you market yourself as an artist. There are too many folks out there that take advantage of young artists, so learn how to sell your art and yourself as an artist!  It is easier than you thought, especially with such business & money tools such as Square.

Another very important thing I’ve learned is not allowing teachers, professors or anyone telling you that a certain technique is not ‘right’ or can’t be done.  Experiment & practice with your own artistic techniques and your individuality will emerge.

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 SAHC: Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?

JTC:  Robyn Slakey.  I love her whimsical ceramic totems.  She’s is very funny & inspiring!

James Lane.  His beautiful impressionist scenes of exotic places evoke the imagination of places I wish to visit!

Maggie Jimenez.  Her fantastical and sometimes frightening ceramic figures and paintings look like they stepped out of an ancient fairytale. So creative!

Mariellen Layne. Love, Love, Love her intricate, colorful & beautiful mosaics! And she’s a beautiful soul!

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SAHC: Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found?

JTC:  In museums and historical sites around the world that I’ve visited, The Louvre, Van Gogh Museum,

Westminster Abbey, Neuschwanstein Castle, Moma NYC, SFMoma, The Cloisters New York, Contemporary Arts Center Cincinnati, and of course, The Crocker + many others!

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SAHC: Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader?

JTC: The Sacramento art scene has allowed me to have a career in art with very little help from the art ‘business’ community. I encourage young artists to rely on selling their own art first, using the ‘art business community’ secondarily. This will allow you to be able to make a living in art. Consistently having to split 50% of the cost of a painting (you cover materials yourself, which gives you only about 30%) with a business, can keep you from having a full time career in art without having a second job. Using the art business world metodically, without being used, is smart.

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SAHC: Where can your work be viewed, or found online?

JTC: John’s Art Studio @ Northend Lofts, FE Gallery in Sacramento, http://www.johnkrempelart.com

https://myspace.com/johnkrempel

 If you are interested in being one of SAHC’s featured artists, email us at: info@sacramentoarthistory.org

 

Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Jill Allyn Stafford

by Bree Garcia

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JS:  I am a collage and mixed media artist based out of Sacramento, California.  I am self-taught and have shown my work in group shows in The Sacramento Temporary Contemporary Gallery, Gallery 21Ten, The Tim Collom Gallery, Barton Gallery, Side Show Studios, BodyTribe, Vox Sacramento, and in gallery shows in New York and Manchester, UK.  I’ve also had work shown in Beatnik Gallery as well as MAIYA Gallery.  I regularly donate art for local benefits, including Big Names, Small Art; Hearts for the Arts; the 6×6 Invitational, and The Sacramento Valley Affiliates of Susan G. Komen’s “Artists for the Cure.”

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SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style? 

JAS:  I never really progressed with my drawing and painting skills past a 6th grade level, so collage is definitely my preferred medium.  It’s hard for me to characterize my style, since I feel like I am constantly evolving and changing it up.  I’d say my work tends more towards the “feminine” (flowers, hearts, birds, butterflies), but with a definitely love of line and flow, with somewhat of an urban edge, although, I love creating abstract landscapes. My creative process starts with collecting paper – magazine, book, old prints, calendars, etc., and sorting it roughly by color or subject (flowers, buildings, etc.). I will place some of them around on my table and simply challenge myself to make something based on what’s before me. It’s really fun, and feels kind of like working on a puzzle or a math problem. And when it all comes together? Awesome. I use acrylic matte medium for my glue, and prefer to place my work on either watercolor paper or wood panels.

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SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community? 

JAS: I strongly believe that I’m responsible for helping other people whether it’s through donating my artwork to local charities or groups for fundraising purposes, or simply by lending my support to other artists by showing up at their events, or talking them up to other artists, collectors, and gallery owners.

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 SAHC: What advice do you have for emerging artists, or those pursuing a career in the arts?  

JAS:  For me, there’s been nothing more helpful and beneficial (in so many ways), than volunteering with non-profit arts organizations. I came into the local arts scene very early on in my art career, and became involved with Vox Sacramento almost immediately. I started volunteering with Vox, throwing art shows, then later booking and organizing art events, and organizing fund raisers, and got to know a large number of local artists almost immediately. It threw me into and made me part of a well-rounded, creative community which is completely necessary as an artist.

For more practical advice, I’m going to say this – when showing your work, it’s key to remember these things, no matter the venue:  1) Communicate, communicate, communicate.  If you have to pull out a show for some reason, let the people who want to show your art know as soon as possible. Seriously. There’s nothing worse than an artist who doesn’t show up when it’s time to hang their work, and you’ll develop a reputation as a flake. People won’t want to work with you again if you leave them hanging. 2)  Make sure your art is ready to hang. This means find out how your work will be installed and make sure your stuff meets the venue’s needs (whether it’s a wire backing, hooks, whatever).  3)  If you’re showing your work on a canvas or a wood panel – make sure the sides are either completely clean OR wrap your art around the sides. Most people aren’t going to frame your canvases/panels when they buy them, so make sure it looks good from all angles! 4) If you’re framing your work for a show, make sure your frames match or at least are all the same color. It may be more pricey, but your work is just going to look better overall if you’re consistent.

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SAHC: Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?
JAS:
Jared Konopitski – Jared is just the coolest. Everyone knows him, he shows everywhere, and his monsters and his pieces are CRAZY (and wickedly under-priced).
Robert Ray – have you ever seen his work? Very, very small collages. Man, they’re the best!
Maureen Hood – I’ve never seen anyone do what she does with collages. Her work is breath-taking, and she’s one of the few artists I’ve met who I’ve been completely tongue-tied around.
Raphael Delgado – Raphael threw me for a loop recently with his new show “Film.”  His usual work is really beautiful, great abstracts, but I love that he really reached outside his comfort zone and did something different than his norm. It takes a lot of guts to try something new.
Dawn Blanchfield – Dawn can do everything, literally everything. I met her thinking she was a photographer (an award winning one at that), and then I saw her paintings. Holy cow. This woman learns new skills and techniques all the time. I never know what she’ll be doing next.

Maren Conrad – I won one of Maren’s pieces at an art auction benefiting the Center for Contemporary Art.  I spent way more money than I have ever spent on art before (thanks in part to the mad skills of the auctioneer David Sobon). Her work is beautiful, feminine, and strong, and I like her personal style – it really speaks to me.

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 SAHC: Besides the Sacramento Art History Consortium, where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found?

JAS: I’d say definitely The Arts and Business Council of Sacramento, as well as local press like Sacramento.365.com, Downtown Grid, and Facebook.

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 SAHC: Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader? 

JAS: Sacramento has an amazingly vibrant and supportive creative community, and I think we have yet to really capitalize on that in any real, meaningful way.  So many wonderful galleries locally, and so many talented artists.  I love living in this city, and am continually amazed by the talent we have right here.

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SAHC: Where can your work be viewed, or found online?

JAS:  I’m transitioning to a new website, so for now you can find me at www.facebook.com/jillallynstafford.

If you are interested in being one of SAHC’s featured artists, email us at: info@sacramentoarthistory.org

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Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Blake Krause

by Bree Garcia

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BK: I was born in Sacramento, but I grew up in New Mexico. I have been drawing off and on all my life, but I got serious about art in my late teens. It was really nice, I was surrounded by talented friends and we all loved to share our work with each other. After working too long at a pizza restaurant, I got dependent on the steady income and lost touch with my art. I fell into a deep depression. I moved back to Sacramento to be with family. I quickly jumped into school to pursue my love of animation, illustration and comics. I graduated in June, with one complete comic under my belt and have been working on comic stuff since.

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 SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style?

BK: Hmmm. I don’t feel like there is much to my creative process. In the past it involved a lot of coffee and all-nighters haha! I guess it starts with a sketch, then I refine, find references if needed, do my final pencil work and then ink. My favorite medium is india ink, water colour, and markers. Usually on Bristol board or comic art boards.

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SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community?

BK: I think it would be to pass on the tradition. I didn’t just start drawing out of nowhere and hardly anyone just starts drawing and is automatically great. I’ve had inspiration, influences, teachers and friends. They all contributed to the artist that I am today, and I think it’s important to share what I’ve learned and where it came from.

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 SAHC: What advice do you have for emerging artists, or those pursuing a career in the arts?

BK: Be tenacious, don’t work in a bubble, and don’t be afraid of being unoriginal. You’ll get there. You just gotta work hard, get out and learn, learn from other artists and expand yourself, and let your work reflect your influences.

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 SAHC: Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?

BK: Casey Robin – She’s super talented and just a wonderful person overall. She’s got a great personality and she’s just so much fun.

My teacher, Mach Yeager – I learned so much from him. And he really drilled me and pushed me to push myself.

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 SAHC: Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found?

BK: The internet haha! Of course, I love art books. I also think it’s important to get out and go to the local museums and galleries.

  SAHC: Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader?

BK: I think that if you look for it you will find it. When I moved out here, I was worried I wouldn’t find my place as an artist then I was kinda surprised by the art scene. We  also have a nice little comic community going on that’s really cool.

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 SAHC: Where can your work be viewed, or found online?

 My website is http://squidblake.wix.com/blakekrause

And my sketch blog is http://squidblakesketchblog.tumblr.com

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Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Cherie E. Hacker

by Bree Garcia

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CH:  I can clearly visualize a painting from thirty years ago when I first attempted an abstract painting.  Not knowing what I was doing, I knew a desire was present in me to express that way.  More than any way of working, this comes through me on a gut level.  Time spent in nature feeds the imagery I use, yet figurative impressions also can appear.  I studied with artists Wayne Thiebaud and Roy DeForest as an undergraduate at UC Davis, but was influenced more by exposure to Abstract Expressionism while in grad school on the East Coast.  Self motivated to make art while growing up in Chicago; my passion for painting has brought me to this place now.

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SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style?

CH:   My intuition guides me.  I paint in layers with oils while making use of other media that have a tactile look and feel.  My energy emerges, drawing through the paint, graffiti like, yet undefined.  It’s not about a specific technique although I develop my own way of working throughout time and experience.    I typically work on three to five paintings at a time.  That is to say, while I focus on one painting, then step back to pause, whatever way I’m working may contribute to another that stands nearby, or possibly that I just need to move away from one, thus turn my attention to another, and perhaps the color that I’m using may work someplace else.  However it manifests, that is the way my brain works.  My brain seems to need my body to move around the room stimulating more of my senses.  I work large when possible to be physical with the work as it becomes an extension of me in a holistic sense.  I paint primarily with canvases hung on the wall; however others stand by on easels or may lie on the studio floor.  I let the painting become with each new discovery.

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SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community?

CH:  Local responsibility: to educate and help to promote the value of artists and of all art disciplines through participation in the community with quality art experiences and by providing art education as a “Teaching Artist.” Also, to volunteer whenever possible to share my expertise, contribute to art events, and be an audience member as well.

Global responsibility: to make conscious decisions on art material use and waste concerning my eco-footprint and health.  I also work ongoing on my “Lamp & Endtable Project,” an environmental art project with an intent to stimulate awareness and thought about respect for the planet.

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SAHC: What advice do you have for emerging artists, or those pursuing a career in the arts?

CH:  Stay strong in the face of adversity. Keep working and developing your art from your heart and follow your intuition. Network with other artists and at events; be kind and mindful of our diverse community.

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SAHC: Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?

CH:  To be honest, I’ve made friends with many Sacramento artists and to say they’re my favorites would be biased. I appreciate the variety and skill levels I see at local shows, and the courage it takes to put yourself out there.

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SAHC: Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found?

CH:  Definitely museums, especially the Smithsonian. I’ve found that museum visits in any city or country will enlighten the viewer for historical content and inspiration, besides their websites for further research. Museum stores also offer great art books and exhibition catalogs to collect and share with others.

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SAHC: Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader?

CH:  We have a vibrant art community in Sacramento, get out and explore all we have to offer and bring the kids!
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CH:  E Street Gallery and Studios 1115 E Street – 2nd Saturdays and by appointment; Axis Gallery 1517 19th St– Dec/Jan Group Show, and a February 2014 Solo Show of new work.  www.hackerartpub.com

If you are interested in being one of SAHC’s featured artists, email us at: info@sacramentoarthistory.org

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Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Craig Martinez

by Bree Garcia

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CM:  Historical, cultural, and spiritual issues heavily influence my artwork, yet these topics may not be immediately apparent in my sculptures. My worldview is based on a fundamental belief in redemption; a form of redemption no longer burdened by cliché convictions, but one tempered by the harsh realities of life. Taking material that was considered worthless and making it into art is a function of my worldview.

My sculptures are composed of wood, wire, canvas and other materials that have been used and discarded. Cuts, scratches and scars are the features that make each piece of debris interesting to me. I am attempting to take these materials and give them another life.

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SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style?

CM:  I painted for years but decided to start sculpting four years ago. For now, it is the only form of art I desire. I rarely sketch out a concept before I start but I will research photos for scale and profile lines. The subject of each sculpture is based on sheer desire. My work often has a Native American nuance, but not all pieces can be categorized as such. Conscious or unconsciously, my work tends toward eternal archetypes. I am interested in the human as a spiritual being burdened with reflective thought. Art that focuses solely on the intellect is of no interest to me. I find it impotent and prosaic.

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SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community?

CM: Sacramento’s art scene is often overlooked because we are situated between San Francisco and Los Angeles.  We are the “middle child” and often excluded simply because of geographic circumstance. As an artist from Sacramento, I believe it is my duty to support all other artists in this community or from this community. We do not have the luxury to become cliquish or sectarian, yet this sometimes happens. Sacramento does not need to “be like” the major art regions in order to be taken serious. Our city has a personality all of its own. The genesis of Sacramento’s art reputation must come from artists supporting one another, and not as an effort to compete with L.A. or San Francisco.

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SAHC: What advice do you have for emerging artists, or those pursuing a career in the arts?

CM: Find your own vision, do not compromise it, and work your ass off.

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SAHC: Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?

CM: Louie The Foot, John Fortes, Jack Alvarez, Frank LaPena, Mick Sheldon, Gale Hart, Rudy Cuear, Skinner and Robert Ray… just to name a few.  The reasons are varied, but the common thread is dedication to their work and I drank lots of beer with many of them.

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SAHC: Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found?

CM: www.masterworksfineart.com, http://ffffound.com, www.thisiscolossal.com, http://nycgallerydirectory.com, www.britishcouncil.org/arts, www.scotteder.com

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 SAHC: Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader?

CM: Support all of the arts here in town. Poets, actors, musicians and painters add to the quality of life in our unique city.

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SAHC: Where can your work be viewed, or found online?

CM: www.craigmartinezart.com, www.lillyvigilgallery.com, www.facebook.com/CraigMartinezArt

If you are interested in being one of SAHC’s featured artists, email us at: info@sacramentoarthistory.org

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