Sacramento Art History Consortium

reviews, musings, and general art-related chatter

Category: Uncategorized

Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Gabriel Sanford

by Bree Garcia

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GS: My style of art seems to be comprised of the repetition of certain abstract design. However, upon closer examination; the viewer can see that the design shows infinite and subtle variations within the context of the drawing. These designs represent a visual language to me, like a snapshot for an emotion or an idea that develops as I let my imagination flow. Ultimately, they represent an inner dialogue with my creative subconscious.

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 SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style?

GS: I don’t envision the final product, I just put pen to paper and start drawing. I have found the less of a plan I have the better it turns out. I tend to work on several pieces at one time because as I am working I get an idea for something else I can do.  My preferred medium is pen and ink and colored pencils.  I don’t feel I follow any specific style although it is mostly abstract.

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SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community?

GS: Because I have had so many people support and help me over the years I feel a responsibility to help other artists and pass that support on.

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SAHC: What advice do you have for emerging artists or those pursuing a career in the arts?

 GS: Learn as much as you can about all aspects of the craft you pursue. For example, don’t just learn how to do a drawing but learn how to frame it and show it. Get connected with other artists and get involved with creative organizations and art galleries. If you don’t find your own niche, create it. Resources like Infusion Project are there to help.

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SAHC: Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?

 GS: I have so many good friends that are artists in Sacramento and they all excel in what they do. I couldn’t just pick one to comment on. Artists like Mark Fox and Tony Allen helped me out when I first started showing and I’ll always appreciate that.

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SAHC: Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found?

GS: The Infusion Project and Vox Sacramento Art Gallery are great resources.

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SAHC: Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like to share with our readers?

GS: Sacramento has a great community of artists that really support each other. Don’t just stick with the art galleries thinking that is the only place that shows art. A lot of the best art I have seen were found in spots you wouldn’t think would have art such as gyms, restaurants, cafes, and in parking lots.

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SAHC: Where can your work be viewed, or found online?

GS: Vox Sacramento Art Gallery (www.facebook.com/voxsac , www.voxsac.com), facebook page called The Gabriel M. Sanford Project (www.facebook.com/GabrielMSanfordProject) and at The Infusion Project (http://theinfusionproject.com/home/artists/visual/gabriel-sanford/).

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Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Natana Rose

by Bree Garcia

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NR: Natana Rose did not realize she was an artist until the lovely age of twenty-eight. Her mother knew the truth twenty-five years prior, thanks to Natana’s flood of ambitious two-year-old scribbles. It took Natana finishing a Masters degree in studio art at California State University, Sacramento before she embraced art as a career. Currently, Natana lives and works in Sacramento. If she is not in her studio you can find her making delicious coffee at Naked Coffee Roasters or Tupelo Coffee House. She loves running with her boyfriend, thrifting, good music, and authentic conversations.

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 SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style?

NR: Natana Rose likes to explore. She prefers paint, pens and paper, and is fascinated with three-dimensional layering. Currently Natana is creating a body of work using cardboard, thread, wood and sometimes cloth. She begins by crafting a wooden box, which she then lines with cardboard that has been painted white. Into that space she combines architectural cardboard shapes that contain paint and thread. The finished product is an abstract window full of activity and dimension for the viewer to enjoy.

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 SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community?

NR: The world is experiencing major shifts and stresses due to decisions made by modern societies, particularly those of the United States. As an artist, Natana believes she has a unique way to present select issues to the public eye and generate discussion. She has big dreams of artistically voicing her concern over actions made by U.S. citizens in relation to food and economy. Natana believes her responsibility to both a local and global community is to accurately present the world in which she lives. Finding truth through new information and experience is a high priority to Natana. Her goal as an artist is to express those truths in a way that is new and engaging.

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 SAHC: What advice do you have for emerging artists, or those pursuing a career in the arts?

 NR: To all emerging artists Natana gives this advice: No matter how busy and stressful your life becomes, always make time for your art, even if it is thirty minutes a day. Make a studio space for your art, even if it is the corner of your bedroom. Art needs a home in which to be born and live. If you are pursuing a career in the arts develop a skill for networking, always put your best foot forward, and explore all of your options. Artists who are willing to put time and effort into their career have a wealth of opportunity in the world. Thanks to internet, websites and online networking artists can now expand their horizons far past their hometown roots.

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 SAHC: Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?

 NR: Three of Natana’s favorite Sacramento grown artists are Meech Miyagi, Tom Monteith and Mikko Lautamo. Each of these artists expand their fields in startling and captivating ways. As a sculptor, Meech takes simple items–tree branches, wire and paper—and creates enchanting, meaningful figures. Tom, as a painter, takes the viewer’s eye on a fantastic journey of abstract push and pull. Mikko, using digital media, explores rich philosophical material in a brilliant array of color and movement. Each of these artists visually discuss their experience of the world.

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 SAHC: Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found?

 NR: The greatest art resource Natana has enjoyed happens to be online search engines or websites devoted to sharing artists adventures. Thanks to PBS, Art Century 21 is a fantastic series devoted to giving a glimpse into the lives of current day artists. This series has often inspired and encouraged Natana to continue her own journey. Natana knows no other better resource for art history than Sacramento State’s art history professor Elaine O’Brian.

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 SAHC: Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader?

 NR: There are amazing artists in Sacramento. If you love art, buy it, that is the best way to show an artist he or she has your support. Art is like wine or beer, you have to spend time with it to develop a taste for its variety and language. Be bold and talk to the artist, you might discover a friend. If an artist’s work confuses you, ask questions. You might fall in love with it after discovering why the artist made it look a certain way. Lastly, thank you for taking time to read this blog and learn a little more about the artists featured here.

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Where can your work be viewed, or found online?

www.natanarose.com

www.facebook.com/natanarose

Contact info:

natanarose@gmail.com

Cell: 530.575.0829

Showing at Red Dot Gallery in December 2013.

http://www.reddotgalleryonj.com

If you are interested in being one of SAHC’s featured artists, email us at: info@sacramentoarthistory.org

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Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Rodante Declarador

by Bree Garcia

Dante_ARTober_2013_-6 RD:  My work is the synthesis of graphic design, graffiti, & pop art.   Inspiration is drawn from artists such as Andy Warhol & Barry Mcgee, as well as iconic graphic designer Saul Bass.  The pursuit of the “perfect” piece has led me on a life long journey that is defined by 3 dots at the end of my signature which means – “to be continued”.  The quest to achieve greatness continues after each piece.  In my lifetime, I strive to create a collection of works that will leave a legacy for generations to come.

SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style?

RD: Once I decide on a piece I first draw the image to be stenciled using my tablet and computer.  I then paint an abstract background using spray paint, and I apply the stenciled image last.

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SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community?

RD: I believe in giving to organizations that you sincerely sympathize with.  My Tupac piece was recently accepted into the “KVIE” art auction.  I also participated in the “My Sisters House” art fundraiser this year.  In the past I’ve also conducted art workshops for the “C.S.D. Teen Center” in Elk Grove and I’ve also worked with at risk youth at School of the Arts in San Francisco.  As an artist it can be tough to make ends meet at times, but you don’t have to donate a ton to make an impact.  I believe that if all artists gave a little to their cause of choice, it can help impact the global community.

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What advice do you have for emerging artists, or those pursuing a career in the arts?

RD: Create a solid portfolio, constantly network, always carry your business cards and never give up even when you are most discouraged, because your big break could just be around the corner.  Branding is also very important, your website, cards, and social networks should all be consistent in appearance and name.

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SAHC:  Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?

RD: David Garibaldi because his style brings so much energy and I’m amazed at the speed he creates a painting.   Derreck Jackson is another artist I admire, his style is unique and his colors are vivid with a lot of energy.  His work can be found at “Derrick J Arts on Facebook.  Abigail Van Cannon is a figurative oil pointer who paints 50’s style art that I really like also, her site is vancannonart.com  I also appreciate the unknown graffiti and street artists that paint throughout the city.

SAHC: Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found?

RD: Crocker Art Museum is a great place to view historic work in person here in Sacramento, but most of my resources are found online.  Computerarts.co.uk is a cool graphic design site I frequent and I also like Artcrimes.org for graffiti art.

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SAHC:  Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader?

RD: Please continue to support your local Sacramento artists whether they are emerging or established

SAHC: Where can your work be viewed, or found online?

RD: My studio is located inside Gallery 21Ten at 2110 K St in Midtown Sacramento and you can view my work at declaredesign.com

If you are interested in being one of SAHC’s featured artists, email us at: info@sacramentoarthistory.org

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Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Avery King

by Bree Garcia

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SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style?

AK: I work mostly in acrylic on canvas. I usually stretch my own canvas, and I develop most of my ideas in sketches before I apply them to the canvas. Once I have a good idea of where I want to go with it, I lay down the basics with charcoal then work with paint to finish it up.

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 SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community?

AK: Locally I believe I should strive to find an original voice rather than chase the styles and trends of larger cities. I feel like Sacramento is sometimes challenged by our status as a smaller city, living in the shadow of the Bay Area, for instance. Yet the things that set us apart should be a part of what comes through in our art. There is a sense of community, for one, that I encounter which exists among widely disparate artists — people who don’t know each other personally and pursue different aims — who recognize and respect one another’s drive.

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SAHC: What advice do you have for emerging artists, or those pursuing a career in the arts?

Ak: Don’t expect to get rich, and don’t accept working for free. You can make a good living, but it’s not easy. If art is what you want to do with your life, pursue it as your first priority, but don’t be ashamed of having a day job. We all got bills to pay.

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 SAHC: Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?

AK: A lot of my favorites have bugged out recently, but many remain: Jared Konopitski, because he’s so true to his spirit and that spirit is so kind it glows, plus his art is totally unique and always makes me smile. Melissa Pagluica because she has a style that is subtle and engaging plus she pushes ahead with projects in a way that’s admirable. Ryan Cicak because he’s kept Pompsicle alive and bridges the art and dramatic communities in a way which benefits everyone involved. The art complex, 21 Ten, houses so many talented people that I feel humbled to share a space with them. It really is a concentration of awesomeness. And there are many others; Pompsicle, for instance, draws a great pool of talented people and creates a little community to itself. That’s just one I’m familiar with but I see that there are lots of these little communities around town and a huge amount of talent here.

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SAHC: Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found?

AK: The Crocker, obviously, has amazing stuff, and the local galleries are always full of surprises. Being a lifelong dork, I’m also a fan of comics and the art that goes along with them, so I can’t pass up a good comic shop and I love to hit up the artist alley at the local Sac-Con when I can make it. A lot of cafes around town have high quality art on display as well, and I’m particularly impressed with what Temple Coffee has achieved (I may be biased since I showed there once). I think any place with wall space should consider recruiting some local artists to adorn their walls.

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SAHC: Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader?

AK: It really is very wide open here, and that is a great thing. There is no need for an artist or an art admirer to feel intimidated about checking out the art scene. One of the best comments I hear from people visiting the studio is that they never thought they would enjoy art until someone dragged them along. Sacramento is big enough to be rewarding yet still small enough to be inclusive.

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SAHC: Where can your work be viewed, or found online?

AK: I’m in studio 11 at 2110 K Street, online at averykingart.com and on facebook at facebook.com/AveryKingArt. I also have work at Antiquite Maison Privee, which is a gem of a venue: very intimate and host to many great music events. If you haven’t discovered it, make your way to a show there; you won’t be disappointed

If you are interested in being one of SAHC’s featured artists, email us at: info@sacramentoarthistory.org

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Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Gerry GOS Simpson

by Bree Garcia

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Gerry moved to the Sacramento region back in 1999 after his years of fashion and stylist work landed him a position as the visual merchandising manager for Nordstrom.  Where as in other cities that he lived he had creative outlet such as entertainment and fashion, here in Sacramento he was looking to fill an empty space, and it was out of that void that he became an artist.   Although he knew nothing about the art scene, or being an artist he began creating and showing his works. While he still humbly refers to himself as an “Up and Coming” artist, his work has been in numerous solo and group shows throughout the region.

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SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style?

GOS: Style… I guess that is a personal thing, I usually tell my students the easiest way to keep from going out of style is to create your own. I am a self taught artist & self taught photographer so basically I run with what I feel. I never had no one who taught me to “do it right”. I did take art through elementary school and high school. I went to the Fashion & Design Institute and cosmetology school, but this was for the purpose of jobs that I had.  I have been a lot of different things; all the things that I have learned over the years are things that I use. I was told that I didn’t paint properly, that I painted flat. I didn’t know what that meant, so if you look at my work now it is a combination of painting flat and painting with the shading and the whole nine yards which has become my style.

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SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community?

GOS: It’s my responsibility to continue good work. It is my responsibility, to make sure if I do a show people walk away and they feel as if they saw something. I am doing everything I possibly can to do something different.  I am a twin and growing up everything had to be like somebody else’s, so as an almost senior citizen I am doing my very best to make certain that everything I do is mine.  That may run the risk of doing stuff that may be ugly or maybe someone may not like it. But at the same time I have a right as an artist to do some funky stuff. There is a lot of Artists who have come before me and I owe a lot to them but I don’t have to paint like them. There has already been Mona Lisa we don’t need to see that chic no more.

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SAHC: What advice do you have for emerging artists, or those pursuing a career in the arts?

GOS: Do Not be afraid to try new stuff, if you see art by me don’t be afraid to see what it is all about  because somewhere deep down in my story is your story is  right there too. Because we are all people and that is the most important thing. If you get involved with people of other cultures your collection has a better chance of growing. If you stick with one culture you tend to paint the same way, or paint the same types of things. So I figure if you open up your door and open up your mind it makes it better for everybody.

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SAHC: Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?

I like Linda Gelfman because her stuff is funky.  Linda Gelfman is my first real artist that I met in Sacramento that became a personal friend of mine. I met Linda because she taught at American River College where I also taught visual merchandising. Linda had a big ladder and I would come around to borrow her ladder, she didn’t really realize that a lot of times I was really there to just see what she was doing. I just wanted to be around the art. She would be one of my favorite artists around town because she does some crazy things.

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SAHC: Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources or references found?

GOS: I look at magazines, I get my references from fashion, I get my references from people, I am a notorious people watcher. My Inspiration comes from anything. I am big on bricks; if you look at my art there is a brick in everything that is an east coast thing. My inspirations come from anywhere, what I like about Sacramento is the challenge of coming up with something new because everyone is looking for something new that is an  inspiration to come up with something fresh.

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SAHC: Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader?

GOS: I would suggest that you do what you love best; when we try to chase rainbows that belong to other people we fall short. The best way to keep on top of your game is to create your own game; it’s when you follow the footsteps of others that you fall in. Everyone that I like I have been wise enough to not want to be.  What I am saying by that is, I may like you ultimately but I know down the road I still have to be me. Looking for the opportunity to be yourself, it is your freedom of expression not someone else’s. The greatest advice that I can give is to be true to yourself, create what makes you happy. Nine times out of ten if you create something that makes you happy it will make others happy.

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SAHC: Where can your work be viewed, or found online?

GOS: Works can be seen in at http://www.Gerry-Simpson.com and I will part of a show coming to the SMUD Gallery which is on faith and religion.

Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Patrick Drayus

by Bree Garcia

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PD:  I’ve been painting for nearly twenty years now, primarily because it is one of the few things that cheer me up, as I tend to be either depressed or riddled with some sort of anxiety the rest of the time. While I work in a variety of styles/mediums, I think my two main categories would be: Political/Angry/Sarcastic and NOT Political/Angry/Sarcastic.

I prefer the latter, as well as the state of mind accompanying it. I feel that feeding the good thoughts is a much more beneficial sort of thing for myself and humanity in general than feeding the bad thoughts….

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SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process?

PD:  I believe a great portion of my creative process is dietary. Generally I wake up, make coffee, have a few cups, a few cigarettes. I do a little writing to clear my head, maybe jot down the previous night’s dreams; turn on some music, check the Facebook account. Rarely do I have any idea in my head when I start painting, except for the political stuff. Generally I like to empty it of any thought whatsoever other than, perhaps, the acknowledgement to myself that I’ve just heard a great new song on the radio, or find myself feeling a sudden appreciation for an old one, however fleeting or temporary such a thing might be. It is likely that I spent the previous night going to sleep to either a radio news station, the late night show “Coast to Coast,” or whatever happens to be on the RT channel, after attempting to read a book for awhile. Maybe something by Philip K. Dick, or Hermann Hesse; the last book I opened was “Alice in Wonderland.”

In any case, it is now time to forget whatever I’ve absorbed since last painting. It inevitably leaks out though. Or in, rather; aspects of this dream, that news item…. Still, once I start working it’s more a journey than anything. Where I am going is not so important as the fact I am moving, intuitively, in the right direction. Generally at some point I reach a fork in the road, or a “Hmm point.” Usually the Hmm Point is a good time to start drinking. I enjoy ales, pilsner, the occasional rum and coke. Often this is accompanied by some sort of lunch, usually leftovers from the previous night’s dinner; preferably something with organic ingredients and quality meats.  I work on a piece until the Hmm Point doesn’t go away, or until I’m finished, whichever comes first. I do not allow myself to sit and stare at a given piece for more than two days. Generally when this happens I take it down, put it to the side and start a new one. Perhaps I will come back to it later, perhaps not. Sometimes I finish five pieces in a day, sometimes one every two weeks….

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SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community?

PD:  I think the only responsibility of an artist anywhere is to continue to evolve creatively, spiritually and intellectually, and to do one’s best to heed the Golden Rule….

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SAHC: What advice do you have for emerging artists, or those pursuing a career in the arts?

PD:  Take care of your health. Eat right, exercise….

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SAHC: Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?

PD:  I like Cherylin Naughton’s work a lot. She channels a very healing sort of energy both psychically and politically into amazing work that seems to be a kind of language all it’s own.

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SAHC:  Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found?

PD:  Pretty much museums and the public library; that and artist Jim Mansfield.

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SAHC: Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader?

 PD: I think the arts are more important now than ever. People need to feed what moves them, what they enjoy, in a tangible manner which seems to require an increasing amount of effort, what with all the craziness going on in the world and what have you…

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SAHC: Where can your work be viewed, or found online?

www.drayus.com

If you are interested in being one of SAHC’s featured artists, email us at: info@sacramentoarthistory.org

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Sacramento Art History Consortium’s Featured Artist: Daphne Burgess

by Bree Garcia

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DB: I am an African American artist living and working in Sacramento.  My background is layered with the love of art, hands on experience, and the desire to increase access to art in my community through teaching.  I am a graduate of UC Davis, with a degree in Art Studio.  My career as a professional artist began as a scenic artist for numerous theatre and production companies. I began teaching art about 15 years ago and continue to teach for various school programs, senior facilities and community centers throughout Sacramento. I work with many local arts organizations as a program manager, special projects coordinator, staff trainer, community liaison, and educator.  I continue to paint, sculpt, design jewelry and work with other artists on community projects.

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SAHC: Can you give us a brief description of your creative process? What is your preferred medium and style?
DB: I work in many different mediums.  I paint mostly, but I also love to draw…figure drawing is one of my favorites…I make jewelry, and ceramic sculpture.  I recently developed a love for fused glass and textile arts and will be working in those mediums more in the future.

I create by drawing from personal experiences and trying to convey my feelings, whatever they happen to be at the time, through my work.  I usually start out with an idea and try to work out in my head how to make the artwork look as close to that image as I can.  Sometimes I might say that “I just needed to paint it to get it out of my head,” maybe it makes it to the point of showing someone, maybe it becomes so personal that it stays in my private collection.  Creating a piece can turn into a therapy session, I have something going on and I just need to paint it out.  Or it could be that I just have an idea and painting it is the way I am more comfortable conveying it.  Sometimes it is hard to turn off that art switch and in the middle of the night I wake up to paint something. And then by morning the idea would have changed numerous times.  Whatever process I am working through at the time, I just try to keep it true to what I feel is “me” on canvas.

I would say that I prefer working with abstracted or exaggerated forms.  My education in art was more traditional but, over time, it left me feeling uninspired.  I prefer a more whimsical style while dealing with social and personal topics. Bright colors and stylized forms characterize my current work about ethnicity, music, love, sexuality, culture and family.  When I first started painting my torso series, I felt empowered in a way that I had never felt before as an artist, in part due to the subject matter and in part to the fact that I felt this style was more “me”.  I began dealing with my femininity, sexuality, relationships and somewhere along the way I discovered that my art was personal, not just something that I was painting for someone else, which was what most of my scenic art was.  I also do a series of pieces personifying musical instruments, working with the idea that so much can be portrayed about a person without representational images of them. That particular style grew from some “portraits” of my grandmother as a quilted figure.  I choose to pick up on the personality of someone through portraying the instruments in human situations.

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SAHC: As a Sacramento artist what responsibilities do you believe that you have to the local and the global community?  
DB: The art scene needs a strong support system made of people who do their part to promote it and educate people about it.  So often I hear discussions about the value of art and whether people truly recognize its worth.  I believe that nurturing the idea of its value starts with the youth that I teach.  If they see, from an early age, the way art makes them feel-the way that they can express themselves, the challenge that they face in creating something new, and how art directly reflects them as a person-they see how much value it truly does have.  And as adults they will continue to appreciate it.  As an African American artist, I personally feel a responsibility to teach about contributions of African Americans artists to the art world.  That stems from my own struggles as a youth of not finding anyone who looks like me making art, thinking that I couldn’t identify with the images I was seeing and questioning “why do it?”  I don’t want any child to feel that way.  On a larger scale, I feel a responsibility to help increase access to the arts through teaching in underserved communities.

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SAHC: What advice do you have for emerging artists, or those pursuing a career in the arts?

DB: I would say that you should experiment as much as possible.  Art encompasses so many different things and you need to find out what aspect really inspires you.

SAHC: Who are some of your favorite Sacramento Artists, and why?  

DB: There are so many local artists that I like for different reasons I couldn’t possibly name them all so I’m going to narrow my choice to just one. I would say that would be Shonna McDaniels.  She is so talented but does so many things she doesn’t get much time to paint.  And actually her artwork isn’t really the main reason why she is one of my favorite artists.  Shonna works tirelessly teaching art to youth all over Sacramento.  She has made it her personal mission to engage youth is art, more specifically African American art, and highlights artists across every medium that have made an impact on the African American art legacy.

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SAHC: Where are some of your favorite Art/ Art History resources found?  
DB: I love books!  I am very old school I guess, and maybe it’s partially due to my art history background, but to me nothing beats finding that hidden treasure of an art book.  I go to the library quite a bit, and bookstores.  I also love talking to other artists.  They are a great source of knowledge and inspiration.
SAHC: Is there anything else about the arts here in Sacramento that you would like share with our reader?

DB: I think there should be more support for small art groups.  As a member of various small art collectives, I think they are often overlooked by the greater Sacramento community and just don’t get the support needed to thrive.  There is great work being done by so many of us in small art groups and it is a shame that it sometimes goes unnoticed, especially by those who could be doing so much to help them out.

SAHC: Where can your work be viewed, or found online?  

DB: I have website, www.dburgessart.com.  And I show regularly at the Sojourner Truth Art Museum, 1001 Del Paso Works and my own studio, Brown Sugar, which will be opening again soon.  I was asked to do illustrations in a children’s book…a great story written by Ayanna Fabio…that will hopefully be out soon.

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